On July 26, an advance movement in Cuba

Category: Comments
Published on Tuesday, 25 July 2017 14:19
Written by Yuniel Rodríguez Chávez
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There is much talk of the exploits of the 26th of July of 1953, the assaults on the Moncada Barracks in Santiago de Cuba and Carlos Manuel de Cespedes in Bayamo, an unforgettable date for all Cubans. But that fact became a powerful and glorious revolutionary group that would also fight for freedom: the 26th of July Movement.

 

I commented that this was a political and military organization created in 1955 by a group of revolutionaries led by Fidel Castro who had a nationalist, anti-imperialist and democratic ideology based on the ideas of José Martí.

 

The 26th of July Movement was the most important cell among those who participated in the struggle against the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista and that at the end of 1956 established a guerrilla base in the Sierra Maestra that ended defeating the troops of the Batista army in 1958.

 

Its name comes from the assault on the Moncada Barracks in Santiago de Cuba on July 26, 1953. The M-26-7, as it was known for its bracelets and posters, was created on June 12, 1955 in clandestinity.

 

By then the young Fidel Castro, his promoter, had just been amnestied and released from prison where he was serving a sentence for leading the assault on the Moncada Barracks in 1953.


The initial nucleus, formed by the group that organized the assault on the Moncada Barracks, merged with the National Revolutionary Movement led by Rafael García Bárcenas and most of the Orthodox Youth. Shortly afterwards they would be joined by Revolutionary National Action led by Frank Pais. Due to the ideological breadth and its goal of overthrowing Batista's tyranny, the 26 of Julio Movement would quickly add young people from the most diverse political backgrounds.

 

The first national direction was made up of: Fidel Castro, Melba Hernández, Haydée Santamaría, Antonio Ñico López, Pedro Miret Prieto, José A. "Pepe" Suárez, Pedro Celestino Aguilera, Faustino Pérez, Armando Hart, Luis Barreto Milián, Jesus Montané and Juan Manuel Márquez.


Translated by Ada Iris Guerrero